Marton Primary Academy pupils become journalists for the day
The children learned about the media, examined 'fake news' and wrote their own articles for the launch issue of the 'Marton News'
Posted by Hannah Vickers | July 16, 2017 | Teaching
marton-primary-academy, lisa-fathers, bright-futures-educational-trust, fake-news, john-stephens

Students at Marton Primary Academy in Blackpool have enjoyed a media and writing training day, thanks to their Academy Trust.

Lisa Fathers, the Head of Teaching School & Co-Principal at Bright Futures Educational Trust (BFET), brought students from other Trust schools to work with the group of Year 5 children on a full day of media training.

This involved examining different newspapers for their range of stories and angles, assessing ‘fake news’, looking at the influence of social media, and preparing broadcast interviews around school news, with top tips provided by ex-journalists.

At the end of the event, the children created their own newspaper, identifying their own local and school news and researching and writing up the stories; every child wrote an article for their launch issue of the ‘Marton News’.

They were quick to recognise that every word counts in the media, and the power that the media holds in swaying public opinion - Lisa Fathers, the Head of Teaching School & Co-Principal at Bright Futures Educational Trust (BFET)

“We like to encourage all types of writing and this session encouraged the students to look at how to tell a story quickly, using the principals of ‘who, what, where and when’,” says Lisa Fathers.  “They were quick to recognise that every word counts in the media, and the power that the media holds in swaying public opinion.”

Nikola, one of the students involved, commented: “I loved putting the newspaper together, and seeing my words on the page. It was really interesting looking at all the different types of stories that run in the UK newspapers.”

Dr John Stephens, BFET CEO  comments: “This was a really engaging and informative session for our young writers and budding broadcasters. It encouraged them to write in a different way, speak clearly in an interview situation, and recognise the ways in which the media shape our world views, which is a valuable lesson to them as they grow and engage further in social and traditional media. It was also a classic example of our Trust sharing resources.”

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